Recent Scientific Publication

 

Construct of DNA glucose sensor yeast plasmid for early detection of diabetes

Journal:Frontiers-Open Access technology – AOT.

Reference:

Cuero Raúl, J. Navia, D. Agudelo, P.Medina. 18 September 2017. Construct of DNA glucose sensor yeast plasmid for early detection of diabetes. Frontiers in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology OAT 2017, Journal of Integrative Obesity and Diabetes. ISSN: 2056-8827. Volume 3(5): 1-9

Abstract

This investigation was aimed at assembling different genetic building blocks to produce a focused DNA sensor to detect proteins related to glucose in blood, in order to diagnose early diabetes using synthetic biology and conventional molecular biology. A glucose DNA sensor was constructed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using genomic and synthesized sequences and were tested in both, In vivo using human blood plasma sampled, and In vitro using cultural media. The results were based on fluorescence intensity of the DNA sensor and compared with clinical methods. The DNA sensor was highly sensitive when mixed with plasma samples from different patients (i.e., diabetic, pre-diabetic, and normal) showing high fluorescence, and was able to detect a wide concentration range of glucose equivalent to clinical glycaemia values. Expression of proteins pertaining to glucose metabolism production was determined by 2D-DIGE gel electrophoresis-maldi analysis. The glucose sensor produced results less than a minute after being mixed with a drop of a human blood sample. Our results highlight the advantages of using constructed DNA sensors to detect glucose in blood for early diagnosis of diabetes.

The yeast DNA glucose sensor was assembled successfully with standardized genetic parts and was able to detect low levels equivalent to clinical glycaemia (<140 mg/ dL), as well as a higher equivalent level of glycaemia (>200 mg/dL). Thus, our sensor can be used for early diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetic conditions, thereby allowing for earlier clinical intervention. The direct correlation between levels of glucose and the intensity of fluorescence of the DNA sensor shows the advantage of using this technology in order to identify specific types of diabetic patients. Sometimes, it is difficult to establish accurate correlations with different methods.

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Molecular and Toxicological characterization of anti-UV Yeast plasmid compound for skin protection

Journal:

Frontiers-Open Access technology – AOT.

Reference:

Cuero, R. Ibarguen H. Molecular and Toxicological characterization of anti-UV Yeast plasmid compound for skin protection, Frontiers in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology OAT 2016, FNN. 1000128 Volume 2(4): 159-164.

Abstract

In the present investigation, we characterized an anti-ultraviolet (anti-UV) metabolite from a yeast plasmid, including testing the toxicological effects of the metabolite in vivo. The present work included the study of the effect of the anti UV yeast plasmid metabolite on protecting and maintaining the morphology of skin fibroblast cells when exposed to UV radiation. Moreover, the investigation used ATP as a mediator for protecting skin fibroblasts when exposed to UV radiation. Our results showed that the anti UV metabolite had a molecular weight ranging between 350 -450 Da which was detected by a very intense low mass ion at m/z 118. Also, small peaks of the m+h of valine or other amine were detected, thus indicating a possible induction effect of the identified molecule on anti-UV proteins. The yeast plasmid metabolite also showed high solubility in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The metabolite seems to exhibit two protective mechanisms against UV radiation in skin fibroblast cells. These include: a) inducing genes for DNA repair related to anti UV proteins such as heat shock proteins (HSP) and other proteins, and b) providing ATP molecules for mediating and/or ameliorating the effects of UV radiation. These mechanisms help maintain the natural morphology of skin fibroblasts when they are exposed to UV radiation. The anti UV metabolite produced by the yeast plasmid showed a good toxicological safety range when a LD50 test was performed. This research clearly demonstrated the great potential of the anti UV metabolite produced by the yeast plasmid for dermatological studies and/or for protective cosmetic purposes.

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Martian soil as a potential source of nanoparticles: Study using martian regolith simulant

Journal:

Frontiers-Open Access technology – AOT.

Reference:

Cuero, R. Martian soil as a potential source of nanoparticles: Study using martian regolith simulant, Frontiers in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology OAT, FNN. Volume 2(2): 91-99.

Abstract

Nanoparticles are characterized by size (<50 nm) and high energy.  Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of electrical conductivity of the Martian Regolith Simulant (MRS) under UV radiation in relation to production of nanoparticles. Results showed good correlation between MRS smaller particle size and higher energy parameter such as charge, as demonstrated by computational modeling. These experimental laboratory results allow us to understand the potential of the MRS as a good source of nanoparticles.

 

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